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Santoña

 On the eastern coast of Cantabria, in the region of Trasmiera:

 

Santoña is a municipality with a strong maritime tradition. Its history and people have always been linked to the sea and to famous mariners. The most well-known is undoubtedly Juan de la Cosa, a cartographer who was instrumental in the discovery of America and a great expert in marine matters, as he demonstrated in his sea chart, a fundamental document for studying cartography at that time. Santoña is also considered to be the place where the caravel, the Santa María, was built.

Historically, the port of Santoña was one of the most significant in Cantabria. Its size and importance were even used in 1774 in a lawsuit against Santander for the title of regional capital. The modern port is 150 years old and is currently the second largest for landing fish, after the regional capital.

Santoña tourism:


Geographically speaking, Santoña is divided into two well-differentiated zones: a plain, which is largely urban, and a mountainous area, with the slopes of Mounts Brusco and Buciero. Brusco point provides a natural separation from Noja, giving way to the open and barren beach of Berria. The magnificent coastline is full of promontories, coves, lighthouses and cliffs, surrounding the mythical Mount Buciero, which encloses the strategic bay of Santoña from the north.

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But in addition to the sea, Santoña is closely linked to" the Monastery of Santa María del Puerto", which has been instrumental in the development of this municipality, and also in that of many others in this eastern section of the region, since numerous towns and churches have sprung up under its influence. The first primitive settlement appeared around this religious centre, which some historians attribute to the Goths.

In time, the original monastery gave rise to the church of Santa María del Puerto, which is today the most highly valued site in local heritage. Built between the thirteenth and seventeenth centuries, it is chiefly Gothic, with Romanesque touches and houses the altarpiece of San Bartholomew with fifteenth-century Flemish paintings (indeed, it is one of the most important altarpieces in Spain).

The fortifications are equally significant. These are a group of military structures around Mount Buciero, which testify to the port's importance. The forts of San Martín, San Carlos and Mazo, or Napoleon are in reasonable condition. Buciero also has several prehistoric caves. The University of Cantabria has excavated the most important of them, known as the El Abrigo del Perro.

The Nature Reserve marshes Santoña:


However, perhaps the most significant symbol of local identity is the Reserva Natural de las Marismas (at the mouth of the Asón). This is a protected area, containing a rich variety of ecosystems that provide seasonal or permanent shelter for a wide range of water birds.

Their festivals and cuisine:


Everything is linked to the sea in Santoña, from the most extraordinary peaceful beaches and its day-to-day life, centred chiefly on fishing and an important canning industry, to its traditional fiestas and seaside carnivals, which are among the most colourful celebrations in the region. Evidently, sea products and fish conserves are the basis of local cuisine.

Currently, Santoña is the first canning port in Cantabria and holds the world fishing record. Industry is based above all on marketing tuna and anchovies. Santoña was the first place where anchovies were preserved in olive oil.

Santoña is a municipality with a strong maritime tradition. Its history and people have always been linked to the sea and to famous mariners. The most well-known is undoubtedly Juan de la Cosa, a cartographer who was instrumental in the discovery of America and a great expert in marine matters, as he demonstrated in his sea chart, a fundamental document for studying cartography at that time. Santoña is also considered to be the place where the caravel, the Santa María, was built.

Historically, the port of Santoña was one of the most significant in Cantabria. Its size and importance were even used in 1774 in a lawsuit against Santander for the title of regional capital. The modern port is 150 years old and is currently the second largest for landing fish, after the regional capital.

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Geographically speaking, Santoña is divided into two well-differentiated zones: a plain, which is largely urban, and a mountainous area, with the slopes of Mounts Brusco and Buciero. Brusco point provides a natural separation from Noja, giving way to the open and barren beach of Berria. The magnificent coastline is full of promontories, coves, lighthouses and cliffs, surrounding the mythical Mount Buciero, which encloses the strategic bay of Santoña from the north.

But in addition to the sea, Santoña is closely linked to the Monastery of Santa María del Puerto, which has been instrumental in the development of this municipality, and also in that of many others in this eastern section of the region, since numerous towns and churches have sprung up under its influence. The first primitive settlement appeared around this religious centre, which some historians attribute to the Goths.

In time, the original monastery gave rise to the church of Santa María del Puerto, which is today the most highly valued site in local heritage. Built between the thirteenth and seventeenth centuries, it is chiefly Gothic, with Romanesque touches and houses the altarpiece of San Bartholomew with fifteenth-century Flemish paintings (indeed, it is one of the most important altarpieces in Spain).

The fortifications are equally significant. These are a group of military structures around Mount Buciero, which testify to the port's importance. The forts of San Martín, San Carlos and Mazo, or Napoleon are in reasonable condition. Buciero also has several prehistoric caves. The University of Cantabria has excavated the most important of them, known as the El Abrigo del Perro.

However, perhaps the most significant symbol of local identity is the Reserva Natural de las Marismas (at the mouth of the Asón). This is a protected area, containing a rich variety of ecosystems that provide seasonal or permanent shelter for a wide range of water birds.

Everything is linked to the sea in Santoña, from the most extraordinary peaceful beaches and its day-to-day life, centred chiefly on fishing and an important canning industry, to its traditional fiestas and seaside carnivals, which are among the most colourful celebrations in the region. Evidently, sea products and fish conserves are the basis of local cuisine.

Currently, Santoña is the first canning port in Cantabria and holds the world fishing record. Industry is based above all on marketing tuna and anchovies. Santoña was the first place where anchovies were preserved in olive oil.